God and the Lamb are the Temple

John the apostle, speaking about New Jerusalem, tells us, “I saw no temple in it, for the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb are its temple” (Rev. 21:22).

New JerusalemThere is no physical temple, no material “house of worship,” no “going to church,” in New Jerusalem. In this wonderful city we will worship God in God and the Lamb. Our priestly service to God will be in God and the Lamb.

Worshipping and serving God in God and the Lamb is a principle in the entire New Testament. The Lord Jesus first revealed this in John 4. The Samaritan woman asked whether the mountain of Samaria or Jerusalem is the proper place to worship. The Lord answered “an hour is coming when neither in this mountain nor in Jerusalem will you worship the Father” (v. 21).

He continued, “An hour is coming, and it is now, when the true worshippers will worship the Father in spirit and truthfulness, for the Father also seeks such to worship Him. God is Spirit, and those who worship Him must worship in spirit and truthfulness” (v. 23-24).

“An hour is coming” points to the Lord’s resurrection. That “hour” is when the resurrected Lord breathed into His disciples and said, “Receive the Holy Spirit” (John 20:22). From that time we worship in spirit. And we will continue to do so in New Jerusalem.

Yes, Christians should gather together (in small or large numbers) for our priestly service to God. But the physical location is not important; it could be outside or in a home or in another building. The important matter is to worship in spirit. God is spirit and our worship in spirit is in oneness with Him.

In New Jerusalem we will all be together in resurrection and will have no need of a physical location. There we will all worship God and the Lamb in the city’s temple, the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb.

Bible verses quoted in these posts are from The Holy Bible, Recovery Version, published and © by Living Stream Ministry, Anaheim CA, 2003. The New Testament of this Bible, with its outlines, footnotes, and cross-references, is at online.recoveryversion.org; this too is © by Living Stream Ministry.

The Wonderful Jesus Christ in Revelation 19 Brings Us to New Jerusalem (2)

Revelation 19 has an extensive presentation and much praise of Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God, who carries out God’s move on earth from His time on earth unto New Jerusalem in eternity. (posts on verses 1-6 and 7-9)

New JerusalemVerse 11: “And I saw heaven opened, and behold, a white horse, and He who sits on it called Faithful and True, and in righteousness He judges and makes war.” Jesus Christ is faithful and true in accomplishing God’s economy. If we think that He is unfaithful in our lives, it is because we are looking at our interests and goals rather than God’s.

“In righteousness He judges and makes war”—this removes all the negative forces on earth so that God’s kingdom can fill the earth in the coming age and in New Jerusalem.

Verses 12-13 and 15-16: “And His eyes are a flame of fire, and on His head are many diadems, and He has a name written which no one knows but Himself. And He is clothed with a garment dipped in blood; and His name is called the Word of God. And out of His mouth proceeds a sharp sword, that with it He might smite the nations; and He will shepherd them with an iron rod; and He treads the winepress of the fury of the wrath of God the Almighty. And He has on His garment and on His thigh a name written,
King Of Kings And Lord Of Lords.”

Jesus Christ is the Lamb of God, the Word of God, the King, and much more. His person has many marvelous aspects. His characteristics in these verses are described in notes here. In Revelation 19 He clears the way for New Jerusalem to come down out of heaven.

Photo courtesy of U.S. National Park Service.

New Jerusalem is the Wife of Jesus Christ

New Jerusalem

Jesus Christ is the Lamb of God. New Jerusalem is the bride, the wife of Jesus Christ. As the bride, New Jerusalem is a corporate composition of all God’s people to marry Jesus Christ. Hence, New Jerusalem is not a physical city.

Behold the Lamb

The Divine-Human Romance thru the Bible

New Jerusalem Foreshadowed in Exodus

All the positive things in the Old Testament are symbols, pictures, or prophecies of the New Testament realities. Some of these pictures correspond with characteristics of New Jerusalem. Here is a list of posts showing parallels between Exodus and New Jerusalem.

We are on a journey to the mountain of God to see a vision, as John saw New Jerusalem from a high mountain. The stages of this journey:
Exodus 12—14: we are redeemed and nourished by the Lamb to leave Egypt
Exodus 15: we sing and praise the Lord on our journey to the mountain
Exodus 16: we eat the manna, a picture of Christ as our heavenly nourishment
Exodus 17: we drink the water which flows out of the smitten rock
Exodus 17: we fight against the flesh by walking in spirit

After we reach the mountain, more steps are needed to see God’s revelation of the building of the tabernacle, a type of New Jerusalem:
Exodus 19—23: God’s commands show that apart from Christ we cannot make the journey
Exodus 23: God promised that His Angel would lead us onward
Exodus 24: we take Christ’s redemption
Exodus 24: we take Christ’s absoluteness for God

When we go up the mountain, we have undivided time with the Lord to see a full vision.
Exodus 24—25: on the mountain we are in a cloud to cut our view of other things
Exodus 24—25: Moses’ time in the cloud prefigures many NT experiences
Exodus 24, 33, 34: Moses had many times of fellowship with God

The holy of holies in the tabernacle depicts New Jerusalem as the eternal holy of holies.
Exodus 25-26: the ark, expiation cover, and cherubim of glory portray Christ and the city
Exodus 26: the veil has been rent by the death of Christ, so we can enter New Jerusalem
Exodus 26: the veil portrays the Lord Jesus, who is the reality in New Jerusalem
Exodus 28: the breastplate with gold and precious stones represents aspects of the city

Exodus 40: glory fills the tabernacle, portraying New Jerusalem, a city of glory

All the events that happened with Israel are an example written for us (1 Cor. 10).
The journey in Exodus
has many symbols of our experiences of Christ and the Spirit.

New Jerusalem

 Photo courtesy of NASA.

 

Pictures of New Jerusalem in Exodus (3)

New JerusalemThe holy of holies described in Exodus is a portrait of New Jerusalem as the eternal holy of holies. The entrance to the holy of holies was  a veil. Hebrews 10:20 tells us is that the veil portrays the flesh of Jesus.

Exodus 26:31 describes the veil: “You shall make a veil of blue and purple and scarlet strands and fine twined linen; it shall be made with cherubim, the work of a skillful workman.”

Because the veil depicts the flesh of Jesus, it relates to His humanity. The linen is His perfect humanity, with heavenliness (blue), royalty (purple), redemption (scarlet, signifying His shed blood), and glory (cherubim).

All of these features are seen in New Jerusalem. The man Jesus is the Lamb of God (John 1:29) who is on the throne in the city (Rev. 22:1); this includes the humanity, royalty, and redemption depicted by the veil. New Jerusalem is heavenly. It comes down out of heaven (Rev. 21:2) but retains the heavenly nature; this too is related to the humanity of Jesus. Also, New Jerusalem has the glory of God (Rev. 21:11).

In Exodus the veil was whole, keeping us out of the holy of holies. This was because men were fallen flesh (Gen. 6:3). In the death of Jesus the old man was crucified and the body of sin was annulled (Rom. 6:6). First Peter 3:18 tells us that He died “that He might bring you to God.”

To be brought to God is to be brought into the holy of holies. We have this access by the blood shed in His death (Heb. 10:19-22). Now we come forward to the throne of grace (Heb. 4:16), to Jesus (Heb. 7:25), and to the holy of holies (Heb. 10). The throne, Jesus, the holy of holies, and our coming forward are all for today and for New Jerusalem. Let us come forward with boldness!

Photo courtesy of pixabay.com.

Out of Everything to be in New Jerusalem

Jesus Christ is the Lamb of God who died to redeem and purchase for God “men out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation” (Rev. 5:5-9). Then He enters these purchased men to make us people of life for New Jerusalem.

“Out of” are important little words. The men purchased by the Lamb no longer belong to the tribes, tongues, peoples, and nations. We belong to Him! And we live to Him!

He died for all that those who live may no longer live to themselves but to Him who died for them and has been raised.
2 Cor. 5:15

New Jerusalem

In New Jerusalem there are no Caucasians and no Hispanics, no Africans and no Europeans. There are no Arabs and no Chinese, no Native Americans and no Aborigines. There are no high-class and no low-class people. There are no cultured and no uncultured, no good and no evil. But there are people OUT OF these and thousands of other distinctions among fallen man.

This is Colossians 3:10-11—we “have put on the new man…where there cannot be Greek and Jew, circumcision and uncircumcision, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free man, but Christ is all and in all.” In the new man, the forerunner of New Jerusalem, there are no human distinctions.

This is also Galatians 3:28—“There cannot be Jew nor Greek, there cannot be slave nor free man, there cannot be male and female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus.” In Christ Jesus there are no human distinctions. We are all one in Him.

These verses state the accomplished fact. But does our experience match? Am I living in Him and to Him, or am I still living according to my race, my nationality, my culture, my upbringing, or my traditions? Lord Jesus, live in me and train me to live to You.

Related post: Everything of God is in Christ Jesus


In Christ Jesus and in the new man there are no distinctions. But we also are members of the human race and the Bible exhorts us to obey the government (e.g. Rom. 13:1). The government recognizes distinctions and we need to obey them as regards human society. For example, when I travel to a foreign nation, I show a passport identifying my nationality, but when I meet with Christians in that nation there are no nationalities because we are all one in Christ.

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