Call on the Lord’s Name and Drink the Spirit

In my Bible reading, I came to 1 Corinthians 12. Verse 13 tells us, “in one Spirit we were all baptized into one Body, whether Jews or Greeks, whether slaves or free, and were all given to drink one Spirit.” This drinking is frequent, as portrayed by our drinking of physical water.

This one Spirit which we drink is depicted by the river of water of life flowing from the throne in New Jerusalem. For eternity we will drink the Spirit.

Isaiah 12:3-5 says, “Therefore you will draw water with rejoicing from the springs of salvation, and you will say in that day, give thanks to Jehovah; call upon His name! Make His deeds known among the peoples….Sing psalms to Jehovah.” To draw this water is to drink. We can drink the Spirit by rejoicing, giving thanks, calling on the Lord’s name, declaring to others what the Lord has done, and singing to Him.

New JerusalemFirst Corinthians is written to the church in Corinth “with all those who call upon the name of our Lord Jesus Christ in every place.” Isaiah 12 ties the calling in chapter 1 to the drinking in chapter 12.

Calling on the name of the Lord began in Genesis 4 and continued through the Old Testament. Peter spoke about it in his first message in Acts 2. Saul identified Christians by their (obviously audible) calling (Acts 9:14).

In New Jerusalem we will drink the Spirit flowing from the throne and I believe that we will also be calling on the name of the Lord Jesus.

Photo courtesy of Good Free Photos.

Where Does the River Flow Today?

In New Jerusalem there is “a river of water of life, bright as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb” (Rev. 22:1).

Where is this river today? The answer is in John 7. “Jesus stood and cried out, saying, If anyone thirsts, let him come to Me and drink. He who believes into Me, as the Scripture said, out of his innermost being shall flow rivers of living water. But this He said concerning the Spirit.”

New JerusalemThe river of New Jerusalem in Revelation is “of life” and this life is the eternal life of God. This is not a physical river but a spiritual river.

This river flows in everyone who comes to the Lord. To come is to drink. This drinking is spiritual: “we were all given to drink one Spirit” (1 Cor. 12:13).

How do we drink? The Lord invites us to come to Him. We can pray honestly and simply to Him, telling Him whatever is on our heart. First Peter 5:7 asks us to cast “all your anxiety on Him because it matters to Him concerning you.”

Isaiah 12:3, “Draw water with rejoicing from the springs of salvation.” When we praise the Lord, we are drinking. And Isaiah 55:1, 6, “Everyone who thirsts, come to the waters….Call upon Him while He is near.” The Lord is rich to all who call upon Him; this is another way to drink the river.

The river of New Jerusalem is the same flowing Spirit we drink today.

Take Freely the Water of Life

 

 

New Jerusalem: the Bride’s Clothing

New Jerusalem is “a bride adorned for her husband” (Rev. 21:2). “And it was given to her that she should be clothed in fine linen, bright and clean.” (Rev. 19:8).

The prior posts showed from Paul and Peter’s writings that the adornment of New Jerusalem is not outward, but is the virtues of Christ brought forth through us. The same principle applies to the fine linen clothing of the bride. This clothing is not a fancy dress as is often seen in human weddings.

There is a multitude “standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes” (Rev. 7:9). The angel told John that this multitude made their robes “white in the blood of the Lamb” (v. 13). This implies that the clothing of New Jerusalem, the bride composed of all this multitude, is not a physical dress but is Christ Himself.

Revelation 19:8 speaks of the clothing, then says “the fine linen is the righteousnesses of the saints.” Christ is the objective righteousness of all His believers. But here Christ as our righteousness has been experienced and is being lived out as righteous deeds, our righteousnesses (plural)._________ two aspects of righteousness

The clear word in Revelation 19 about our clothing being Christ as our virtues is the flip side of Isaiah 64:6, “all our righteous deeds are like a polluted garment.” When we live Christ, our garment is bright and clean, but when we live in self, our garment is filthy. Other verses about our garments should be viewed in the same way. This is New Jerusalem: the city is clothed with Christ to express Him.

 

New Heaven and New Earth with Rejoicing

New JerusalemJohn tells us, “I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth passed away, and the sea is no more. And I saw the holy city, New Jerusalem…” (Rev. 21:1-2)

What John saw had already been promised centuries before. in Isaiah 65:17 God promises, “I am now creating new heavens and a new earth, and the former things will not be remembered, nor will they come up in the heart.” The new heavens and new earth are again promised in Isaiah 66:22.

What are the former things which will not be remembered? Isaiah 65:16 says, “the former troubles are forgotten.” In New Jerusalem the Lamb is on the throne. This surely indicates remembrance of His redemption. This fact together with Isaiah 65:16 suggests that we will remember everything related to bringing forth the new creation but will forget everything negative of the old creation.

In New Jerusalem we will remember Gold’s eternal purpose, His selection and predestination, His redemption, His impartation of eternal life, and all that His life accomplished in us. We, and the whole new creation, will also rejoice. God’s word in Isaiah 65:18 is, “rejoice and exult forever, in what I create, for I am now creating Jerusalem as an exultation and her people as a rejoicing.”

You might say that God’s promise was a long time ago and you haven’t seen anything. True, but God’s sense of time is not the same as ours. What He promises, He will achieve. We will see New Jerusalem at the center of the new heavens and new earth, and we will rejoice.

Photo courtesy of pixabay.com.

The Morning Star Rises and the Day Dawns unto the Full Day of New Jerusalem

New JerusalemRevelation 21:23 tells us, “the city has no need of the sun or of the moon that they should shine in it, for the glory of God illumined it, and its lamp is the Lamb.” Because the glory of God illuminates New Jerusalem, “there will be no night there” (v. 25).

God is light and God’s intention is to bring us into light. When we are in New Jerusalem we are fully and constantly in the divine light. This journey to the light of New Jerusalem is touched multiple times in the Bible.

Zachariah, father of John the Baptist, prophesied concerning the coming of Jesus, “the rising sun will visit us from on high.” God is light and He emphasizes the sunrise with its move toward full day; sunset is not in His desire. Some sunrise examples:
Isaiah 60:2, “the darkness will cover the earth, and deep darkness the peoples; but Jehovah will rise upon you, and His glory will be seen upon you.”
Malachi 4:2,”unto you who fear My name will the Sun of righteousness arise with healing in His wings.”
Proverbs 4:18, ” the path of the righteous is like the light of dawn, which shines brighter and brighter until the full day.”

When Jesus began His ministry, He came to Capernaum (Matt. 4:13-16). This fulfilled a prophecy in Isaiah 9, which says “The people sitting in darkness have seen a great light; and to those sitting in the region and shadow of death, to them light has risen.” And at the end, He said, “I Jesus…am…the bright morning star” (Rev. 22:16).

John 1 tells us that “the life is the light of men.” Life and light go together and heal us from blindness, sin, and death. This healing, and all the rising light is ultimately for the glory of New Jerusalem.

Photo by Samantha Cristoforetti, courtesy of NASA and ESA.

Living Water Flows to, in New Jerusalem (3)

New JerusalemJesus went through death and entered into resurrection to release the flow of water of life, fulfilling His promises in John 4:14 and 7:37-39. This same water of life continues to flow as the river in New Jerusalem.

The release of living water in His death, seen in John 19, was foretold in Exodus 17. Moses was told to strike a rock so that water would come out for the people to drink as they travelled through the desert. First Corinthians 10:4 summarizes that experience, saying “all drank the same spiritual drink; for they drank of a spiritual rock which followed them, and the rock was Christ.”

Today, on our way to New Jerusalem, we are in a “desert.” The world around us is spiritually dry, without satisfaction to our inner thirst. The striking of the rock in Exodus 17, as a picture of the judgment of Christ on the cross, was once for all. Later, in Numbers 20, God told Moses to speak to the rock and it would release water to drink.

Today “the Rock is Christ” and we can “speak to the Rock.” Lord, I am thirsty, give me a drink of living water.

First Corinthians 12:13 says, “in one Spirit we were all baptized into one Body…and were all given to drink one Spirit.” How to drink? Isaiah 12:3: “you will draw water with rejoicing from the springs of salvation.” Isaiah 12:4 adds that, in that day, we will give thanks to the Lord and call on His name. To rejoice, give thanks, and call Lord Jesus are all ways to drink the living water. Practice now and expect to do more in New Jerusalem.

Photo courtesy of pixabay.com.

Created for the Glory of New Jerusalem

In Isaiah 43 God speaks of gathering His scattered people, “Everyone who is called by My name, whom I have created, formed, and even made for My glory” (v. 7).

The words create, form, and make all appear in Genesis 1–2 (e.g. 1:1, 26; 2:4, 7-8). The declaration in Isaiah 43:7 shows us that all God’s work from the beginning of creation has a goal—His glory. God created us not merely to live a good human life. God put man in the garden of Eden with the tree of life. This is a picture of God wanting to be life to us.

New JerusalemThis picture in Genesis 2 is before sin, before death, before the curse, before rebellion against God. God being life to us is not a reaction to these negatives. God wants His life to be received by us, to be in us for His glory.

The tree of life is also in New Jerusalem. Christ has become life to all His believers and is our life eternally. This life operates in us to transform us and build us together to be His corporate Body in this age and to be the city of New Jerusalem in eternity.

This is “for God’s glory.” New Jerusalem “has the glory of God” (Rev. 21:11). The glory of God illuminates New Jerusalem (21:23). And, because the city is like clear, transparent glass (21:11, 18, 21), God’s illuminating glory will shine out through the city.

In these verses we see three steps. First, God created, formed, and made us. Second, God in Christ became life to us. Third, the result is God’s glory. These three steps cover the entire Bible, from creation to New Jerusalem.

Photo courtesy of pixabay.com.

Our God, Our Dwelling, is the Living Temple

New JerusalemThe prior five posts look at the living New Testament temple. This began with the Lord Jesus in John 2, with His body, the real temple of God, “destroyed” by the Jews in crucifixion but raised up in resurrection. The living temple concludes with God and the Lamb as the temple of New Jerusalem in Revelation 21.

This living temple was typified by the physical tabernacle and temple in the Old Testament, but this physical structure was not God’s eternal intention.

Moses, who oversaw the building of the tabernacle, realized this. In Psalm 90:1 he declared, “O Lord, You have been our dwelling place in all generations.” In eternity, in New Jerusalem, the Lord will still be our dwelling place.

Isaiah speaks similarly, “You shall sanctify Jehovah of hosts; He shall be the One to fear and He shall be the One to be awed by. Then He will become a sanctuary” (8:13-14a). When our heart pursues sanctification, the Lord becomes our sanctuary, our dwelling place, our temple. The ultimate stage of this is the holy (sanctified) city New Jerusalem.

We have been sanctified positionally at our initial salvation. Now we need to pursue experiential sanctification, that is, being separated unto God from everything else by being saturated with His holy nature. In this way He becomes our sanctuary, our temple.

Both Moses and Isaiah saw beyond the outward pictures of the tabernacle and temple. They saw that the real temple is the living God Himself. Lord, bring us to the same realization that they had; We want to experience dwelling in You as our living temple not only in New Jerusalem but also in this age.

Graphic courtesy of pixabay.com.

Bible verses quoted in these posts are from The Holy Bible, Recovery Version, published and © by Living Stream Ministry, Anaheim CA, 2003. The New Testament of this Bible, with its outlines, footnotes, and cross-references, is at online.recoveryversion.org; this too is © by Living Stream Ministry.

Baptized in One Spirit into One Body           and into New Jerusalem

All believers in Jesus Christ, although very numerous, “are one Body in Christ” (Rom. 12:5). To be “one Body in Christ” is not by our doing. Rather, 1 Corinthians 1:29-30 assures us, “of God you are in Christ Jesus.” In the same way, it is of God that we are in New Jerusalem and are one organic city in Christ.

New JerusalemHow did God put us into Christ so that we could be one Body in Him? First Corinthians 12:13 tells us, “in one Spirit we were all baptized into one Body.”

This Body is the present reality of New Jerusalem. The oneness of the Body of Christ and the oneness of the new man (Eph. 2:15, Col. 3:10-11) both point toward the oneness of New Jerusalem.

How do we partake of this oneness? “In one Spirit we were all baptized into one Body…and were all given to drink one Spirit.” Isaiah 12:3-4: “You will draw water with rejoicing from the springs of salvation, and you will say in that day, Give thanks to Jehovah; call upon His name!”

These verses tell us that spiritual drinking is calling on the name of the Lord. Calling O Lord Jesus brings us into the practicality of the oneness as our foretaste of New Jerusalem. We can also cry out O Lord Jesus, we love You!

Surely New Jerusalem will be full of rejoicing, thanksgiving, calling, and loving the Lord.

Bible verses quoted in these posts are from The Holy Bible, Recovery Version, published and © by Living Stream Ministry, Anaheim CA, 2003. The New Testament of this Bible, with its outlines, footnotes, and cross-references, is at online.recoveryversion.org; this too is © by Living Stream Ministry.

Drinking by Calling on the Lord at Holding to Truth.

The Nations Walk by New Jerusalem’s Light

Recent posts on parallels between Isaiah 60 and Revelation 21 mentioned the nations around New Jerusalem. These nations walk by the light of New Jerusalem (Rev. 21:24), bring their glory and honor into it (Rev. 21:26), and are healed by the leaves of the tree of life (Rev. 22:2).

New JerusalemWho are these nations? Let’s start by seeing who these nations are not. Revelation 21:24, 26, and 22:2 all use the plural nations. God’s people are not the nations. The Lord Jesus has purchased us for God, redeeming us “out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation” (Rev. 5:9).

Because of the Lord’s redemption, we are out of, not in, the nations. Acts 15:14 says that God began in the house of Cornelius (Acts 10) “to take out from them [the nations] a people for His name.” In God’s eyes we are no longer called by the name of a nation (e.g. Canadian, Mexican, Japanese, German, Syrian, Nigerian, Brazilian, etc.). Rather, we are God’s people, called by His name, both now and in New Jerusalem.

Further, 1 Corinthians 10:32 speaks of Jews and Greeks and the church. These are three separate, distinct categories of people—God’s Old Testament people, one of the nations, and God’s New Testament people. Eventually, in New Jerusalem, God’s Old Testament and New Testament people will be combined.

When we believe into Christ, God brings us out of the nations and into Him. “For you are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus. For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ” (Gal. 3:26-27). Being in Christ, and Christ living in us, is eternal. We are out of the nations and in Him both now and in New Jerusalem.

Photo courtesy of U.S. National Park Service.

 

Isaiah Speaks About New Jerusalem (2)

New JerusalemRevelation 21:24 to 26 says, “The nations will walk by its [New Jerusalem’s] light; and the kings of the earth bring their glory into it. And its gates shall by no means be shut by day, for there will be no night there. And they will bring the glory and the honor of the nations into it.”

Revelation 21:24 matches Isaiah 60:3, “Nations will come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your rising.” Here “your” is probably not only New Jerusalem in eternity but also restored earthly Jerusalem in the millennial kingdom.

Verse 25a matches Isaiah 60:11a, “Your gates will be open continually; they will not be closed day or night.” Again, “your” is probably both restored Jerusalem and New Jerusalem. Verse 25b speaks of “no night” because the eternal, unvarying God in Christ is the light of the city.

Verse 26 matches Isaiah 60:5b, “The wealth of the nations will come to you.” It also matches Isaiah 60:11b, the gates of New Jerusalem will be open “So that they may bring to you the wealth of the nations.”

It was easy for Isaiah to speak things of New Jerusalem because He was a prophet of the God of New Jerusalem. What Isaiah prophesied and what John “saw” (e.g. Rev. 21:2, 22) of New Jerusalem is the inheritance of all God’s people.

Artwork courtesy of pixabay.com.

 

Isaiah Speaks About New Jerusalem

Revelation 21:23 says about New Jerusalem, “The city has no need of the sun or of the moon that they should shine in it, for the glory of God illumined it, and its lamp is the Lamb.” Revelation 22:5 says that those who constitute New Jerusalem, “have no need of the light of a lamp and of the light of the sun, for the Lord God will shine upon them.”

New JerusalemIsaiah 60:19-20 says, You will no longer have the sun for your light by day, nor for brightness will the moon give you light; but Jehovah will be an eternal light to you, and your God your beauty. Your sun will no longer go down, nor will your moon withdraw; for Jehovah will be an eternal light to you, and the days of your mourning will be ended.”

Isaiah is clearly a prophecy about New Jerusalem. Isaiah and Revelation match in no need of the sun, no need of the moon, and God being the light of the city.

Isaiah also tells us that “mourning will be ended.” In new heaven and new earth with New Jerusalem there will be no curse (Rev. 22:3), no devil (Rev. 20:10), no death (Rev. 20:14), and no sickness.

In addition, Isaiah tells us that God is the beauty of New Jerusalem. How wonderful that God Himself becomes the beauty. In New Jerusalem all outward beautification will be eliminated, just as lamps, sun, and moon are unneeded. God will show Himself as the most beautiful One in and through New Jerusalem.

Photo courtesy of NASA.

 

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