Created for the Glory of New Jerusalem

In Isaiah 43 God speaks of gathering His scattered people, “Everyone who is called by My name, whom I have created, formed, and even made for My glory” (v. 7).

The words create, form, and make all appear in Genesis 1–2 (e.g. 1:1, 26; 2:4, 7-8). The declaration in Isaiah 43:7 shows us that all God’s work from the beginning of creation has a goal—His glory. God created us not merely to live a good human life. God put man in the garden of Eden with the tree of life. This is a picture of God wanting to be life to us.

New JerusalemThis picture in Genesis 2 is before sin, before death, before the curse, before rebellion against God. God being life to us is not a reaction to these negatives. God wants His life to be received by us, to be in us for His glory.

The tree of life is also in New Jerusalem. Christ has become life to all His believers and is our life eternally. This life operates in us to transform us and build us together to be His corporate Body in this age and to be the city of New Jerusalem in eternity.

This is “for God’s glory.” New Jerusalem “has the glory of God” (Rev. 21:11). The glory of God illuminates New Jerusalem (21:23). And, because the city is like clear, transparent glass (21:11, 18, 21), God’s illuminating glory will shine out through the city.

In these verses we see three steps. First, God created, formed, and made us. Second, God in Christ became life to us. Third, the result is God’s glory. These three steps cover the entire Bible, from creation to New Jerusalem.

Photo courtesy of pixabay.com.

Our God, Our Dwelling, is the Living Temple

New JerusalemThe prior five posts look at the living New Testament temple. This began with the Lord Jesus in John 2, with His body, the real temple of God, “destroyed” by the Jews in crucifixion but raised up in resurrection. The living temple concludes with God and the Lamb as the temple of New Jerusalem in Revelation 21.

This living temple was typified by the physical tabernacle and temple in the Old Testament, but this physical structure was not God’s eternal intention.

Moses, who oversaw the building of the tabernacle, realized this. In Psalm 90:1 he declared, “O Lord, You have been our dwelling place in all generations.” In eternity, in New Jerusalem, the Lord will still be our dwelling place.

Isaiah speaks similarly, “You shall sanctify Jehovah of hosts; He shall be the One to fear and He shall be the One to be awed by. Then He will become a sanctuary” (8:13-14a). When our heart pursues sanctification, the Lord becomes our sanctuary, our dwelling place, our temple. The ultimate stage of this is the holy (sanctified) city New Jerusalem.

We have been sanctified positionally at our initial salvation. Now we need to pursue experiential sanctification, that is, being separated unto God from everything else by being saturated with His holy nature. In this way He becomes our sanctuary, our temple.

Both Moses and Isaiah saw beyond the outward pictures of the tabernacle and temple. They saw that the real temple is the living God Himself. Lord, bring us to the same realization that they had; We want to experience dwelling in You as our living temple not only in New Jerusalem but also in this age.

Graphic courtesy of pixabay.com.

Bible verses quoted in these posts are from The Holy Bible, Recovery Version, published and © by Living Stream Ministry, Anaheim CA, 2003. The New Testament of this Bible, with its outlines, footnotes, and cross-references, is at online.recoveryversion.org; this too is © by Living Stream Ministry.

Baptized in One Spirit into One Body           and into New Jerusalem

All believers in Jesus Christ, although very numerous, “are one Body in Christ” (Rom. 12:5). To be “one Body in Christ” is not by our doing. Rather, 1 Corinthians 1:29-30 assures us, “of God you are in Christ Jesus.” In the same way, it is of God that we are in New Jerusalem and are one organic city in Christ.

New JerusalemHow did God put us into Christ so that we could be one Body in Him? First Corinthians 12:13 tells us, “in one Spirit we were all baptized into one Body.”

This Body is the present reality of New Jerusalem. The oneness of the Body of Christ and the oneness of the new man (Eph. 2:15, Col. 3:10-11) both point toward the oneness of New Jerusalem.

How do we partake of this oneness? “In one Spirit we were all baptized into one Body…and were all given to drink one Spirit.” Isaiah 12:3-4: “You will draw water with rejoicing from the springs of salvation, and you will say in that day, Give thanks to Jehovah; call upon His name!”

These verses tell us that spiritual drinking is calling on the name of the Lord. Calling O Lord Jesus brings us into the practicality of the oneness as our foretaste of New Jerusalem. We can also cry out O Lord Jesus, we love You!

Surely New Jerusalem will be full of rejoicing, thanksgiving, calling, and loving the Lord.

Bible verses quoted in these posts are from The Holy Bible, Recovery Version, published and © by Living Stream Ministry, Anaheim CA, 2003. The New Testament of this Bible, with its outlines, footnotes, and cross-references, is at online.recoveryversion.org; this too is © by Living Stream Ministry.

Drinking by Calling on the Lord at Holding to Truth.

The Nations Walk by New Jerusalem’s Light

Recent posts on parallels between Isaiah 60 and Revelation 21 mentioned the nations around New Jerusalem. These nations walk by the light of New Jerusalem (Rev. 21:24), bring their glory and honor into it (Rev. 21:26), and are healed by the leaves of the tree of life (Rev. 22:2).

New JerusalemWho are these nations? Let’s start by seeing who these nations are not. Revelation 21:24, 26, and 22:2 all use the plural nations. God’s people are not the nations. The Lord Jesus has purchased us for God, redeeming us “out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation” (Rev. 5:9).

Because of the Lord’s redemption, we are out of, not in, the nations. Acts 15:14 says that God began in the house of Cornelius (Acts 10) “to take out from them [the nations] a people for His name.” In God’s eyes we are no longer called by the name of a nation (e.g. Canadian, Mexican, Japanese, German, Syrian, Nigerian, Brazilian, etc.). Rather, we are God’s people, called by His name, both now and in New Jerusalem.

Further, 1 Corinthians 10:32 speaks of Jews and Greeks and the church. These are three separate, distinct categories of people—God’s Old Testament people, one of the nations, and God’s New Testament people. Eventually, in New Jerusalem, God’s Old Testament and New Testament people will be combined.

When we believe into Christ, God brings us out of the nations and into Him. “For you are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus. For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ” (Gal. 3:26-27). Being in Christ, and Christ living in us, is eternal. We are out of the nations and in Him both now and in New Jerusalem.

Photo courtesy of U.S. National Park Service.

 

Isaiah Speaks About New Jerusalem (2)

New JerusalemRevelation 21:24 to 26 says, “The nations will walk by its [New Jerusalem’s] light; and the kings of the earth bring their glory into it. And its gates shall by no means be shut by day, for there will be no night there. And they will bring the glory and the honor of the nations into it.”

Revelation 21:24 matches Isaiah 60:3, “Nations will come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your rising.” Here “your” is probably not only New Jerusalem in eternity but also restored earthly Jerusalem in the millennial kingdom.

Verse 25a matches Isaiah 60:11a, “Your gates will be open continually; they will not be closed day or night.” Again, “your” is probably both restored Jerusalem and New Jerusalem. Verse 25b speaks of “no night” because the eternal, unvarying God in Christ is the light of the city.

Verse 26 matches Isaiah 60:5b, “The wealth of the nations will come to you.” It also matches Isaiah 60:11b, the gates of New Jerusalem will be open “So that they may bring to you the wealth of the nations.”

It was easy for Isaiah to speak things of New Jerusalem because He was a prophet of the God of New Jerusalem. What Isaiah prophesied and what John “saw” (e.g. Rev. 21:2, 22) of New Jerusalem is the inheritance of all God’s people.

Artwork courtesy of pixabay.com.

 

Isaiah Speaks About New Jerusalem

Revelation 21:23 says about New Jerusalem, “The city has no need of the sun or of the moon that they should shine in it, for the glory of God illumined it, and its lamp is the Lamb.” Revelation 22:5 says that those who constitute New Jerusalem, “have no need of the light of a lamp and of the light of the sun, for the Lord God will shine upon them.”

New JerusalemIsaiah 60:19-20 says, You will no longer have the sun for your light by day, nor for brightness will the moon give you light; but Jehovah will be an eternal light to you, and your God your beauty. Your sun will no longer go down, nor will your moon withdraw; for Jehovah will be an eternal light to you, and the days of your mourning will be ended.”

Isaiah is clearly a prophecy about New Jerusalem. Isaiah and Revelation match in no need of the sun, no need of the moon, and God being the light of the city.

Isaiah also tells us that “mourning will be ended.” In new heaven and new earth with New Jerusalem there will be no curse (Rev. 22:3), no devil (Rev. 20:10), no death (Rev. 20:14), and no sickness.

In addition, Isaiah tells us that God is the beauty of New Jerusalem. How wonderful that God Himself becomes the beauty. In New Jerusalem all outward beautification will be eliminated, just as lamps, sun, and moon are unneeded. God will show Himself as the most beautiful One in and through New Jerusalem.

Photo courtesy of NASA.

 

The Divine Romance: God & New Jerusalem

rose, pixabay.com

More at New Jerusalem is the Consummation of All the New Testament Blessings.

Photo courtesy of pixabay.com.

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